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Ross Sea Explorer

A true voyage of discovery following the paths of the early explorers, offering insight into the history of Amundsen, Shackleton and Scott's expeditions, to name just a few. Combine this with abundant wildlife encounters including King, Gentoo and Southern Rockhopper penguin rookeries, along with Minke and Orca whale sightings, and you have a complete Antarctic odyssey. Commencing our journey with a crossing of the Drake Passage we arrive along the Antarctic Peninsula sailing through the Pendleton Straight Channel. Over the coming days we hope to visit volcanic Peter I Island, Detaille and Fish Island. Sailing north we will follow an exploratory program as we make our way through the Amundsen Sea to the Ross Sea. Here we hope to visit the huts of British explorers Ernest Shackleton and Robert Falcon Scott (ice-permitting), along with visits to the US and New Zealand research bases at Ross Island. Stopping at both Macquarie and Campbell Island we will have a chance to get up close with large numbers of the islands fauna before continuing on to Bluff where we disembark the ship.

Inclusions

32 breakfasts, 31 lunches and 32 dinners
Comfortable cabin accommodation and use of all public areas on cruise
Services of expedition leaders
All sightseeing and shore excursions from the ship including the use of zodiacs
Lectures, videos, slide and film shows and guide services
All landing fees and permits
Port taxes and port charges imposed by government authorities
Pre-departure information
The use of helicopters for ship to shore transfers, subject to weather conditions
Hightlights
Historic huts and research station visits
Wildlife rich Sub Antarctic islands
The Ross Ice shelf
Large glaciers and fantastic tabular bergs
Ad lie and Emperor penguins, whales, seals and sea birds
Explore the abundant wildlife of the Antarctic Peninsula
Cross the fabled Drake Passage
Tour Provider World Expeditions
Number of Days
33
Price From
AUD $27,500
Start Location
Ushuaia, Antarctica
End Location
Antarctica
Age Range
Min :14
Group Size
1 to 114
Tour Style
Standard
Tour Themes
Polar
Physical Rating
Mild
Tour departure dates
StartEndAvailabilityPrice
13 Jan 202015 Feb 2020AvailableAUD $27,500
16 Feb 202018 Mar 2020AvailableAUD $27,500
ItineraryExpand
Day 1
In the afternoon, we embark in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, the southernmost city in the world located at the Beagle Channel and sail through this scenic waterway for the rest of the evening.
Days 2-3
Some of us will approach this historic crossing with more than a little trepidation. But despite its reputation, there are many times when the Drake Passage resembles a lake, with lazy Southern Ocean swells rolling under the keel. On the other hand, we sometimes encounter rough crossings with large waves. The size of the waves and the force of the gale will take on gigantic proportions when related around the fire back home. The mood on board is definitely casual. A favourite pastime is to stand at the stern deck watching the many seabirds, including majestic albatrosses and giant petrels, following in our wake, skillfully using the air currents created by the ship to gain momentum. During our Drake crossing, we will commence our lecture program about the wildlife, geology, history and geography of the Antarctic Peninsula. Antarctica is a photographers' paradise, for the professional and amateur alike. There will be discussions about how to protect your equipment from salt water, and tips about taking good pictures. Nearing the tip of the Peninsula towards the end of day three, excitement reaches fever pitch with everyone on the bridge watching for our first iceberg. The ocean takes on a whole new perspective once we are below the Antarctic Convergence and are surrounded by the surreal presence of floating ice sculptures. The memory of your first big iceberg sighting is likely to remain with you forever.
Day 4
You arrive at the Antarctic Peninsula near the Antarctic Circle in the afternoon. If sea ice allows it, you can then continue through Pendleton Strait and attempt a landing at the rarely visited southern tip of Renaud Island. Here you have the opportunity to see the first Ad lie penguins of the trip as well as enjoy spectacular views of the icebergs in this surreal, snow-swept environment.
Days 5-6
Sailing through Bellingshausen Sea, where we may see our first pack-ice.
Day 7
Peter I Island or in Norwegian Peter I y is an uninhabited volcanic island (19 kilometres long ) in the Bellingshausen Sea. It was discovered by Fabian von Bellingshausen in 1821 and was named after the Russian Tsar Peter I. It is claimed by Norway and considered a territory by its own. It is sporadically visited by passenger vessels.
Days 8-14
These days we sail through the Amundsen Sea along and through the outer fringes of the pack-ice, which - depending of ice-conditions - will give us glimpses of the Antarctic Continent, while we take advantage of the west-going Antarctic coastal current. The sailing along and through the ice is very lively, with sightings of single straggling Emperor Penguins, groups of seals on ice-fls, and also Orca's and Minke Whales along the ice-edge, often accompanied by different species of fulmar petrels. If the sea-ice allows, we will try to land on Shephard Island in Marie Byrd Land among colonies of Chinstrap Penguins and South Polar Skua's. Shephard Island was discovered by the US Antarctic Expeditions (USAS) of 1939-41 and was named after one of the promoters of this expedition: John Shephard.
Days 15-17
The next goal is to enter the Ross Sea from the east, venturing south toward the Bay of Whales and close to Roosevelt Island (named in 1934 by the American aviator Richard E. Byrd for President Franklin D. Roosevelt). The Bay of Whales is part of the Ross Ice Shelf, the largest ice shelf in the world, and is constantly changing with the receding ice masses. Large icebergs are present here, along with great wildlife opportunities. Roald Amundsen gained access to the shelf en route to the South Pole, which he reached on December 14, 1911. Also, the Japanese explore Nobu Shirase had his camp in this area in 1912, at Kainan Bay. You may make a helicopter landing on the ice shelf if conditions allow. During this part of the voyage, we will also cross the International Date Line.
Days 18-20
Keeping to the Ross Sea, the aim is now to visit Ross Island. From here you can see Mount Erebus, Mount Terror, and Mount Byrd, as well as many other famous spots that played an important role in the British expeditions of the last century: Cape Royds, where Ernest Shackleton's cabin still stands; Cape Evans, where the cabin of Robert Falcon Scott can still be seen; and Hut Point, from which Scott and his men set out for the South Pole. If ice is blocking the way but weather conditions are favourable, you may use the helicopters to land in one or more spots in this area. The American scientific base of McMurdo Station and New Zealand's Scott Base are other possible locations you might visit. From McMurdo Station you could also make a 10-km hike (6 miles) to Castle Rock, where there are great views across the Ross Ice Shelf toward the South Pole. Additionally, you may make a helicopter landing in Taylor Valley, one of the Dry Valleys, where conditions are closer to Mars than anywhere else on Earth.
Days 21-22
Sailing north along the west coast of the Ross Sea, you pass the Drygalski Ice Tongue and Terra Nova Bay. If ice conditions allow, you then land at Inexpressible Island, which has a fascinating history in connection to the less-known Northern Party of Captain Scott's expedition. It is also home to a large Ad lie penguin rookery. Should sea ice prevent entry into Terra Nova Bay, you may head farther north to the protected area of Cape Hallett and its own Ad lie rookery.
Day 23
Cape Adare is the place where people for the very first time wintered on the Antarctic Continent. The hut where the Norwegian Borchgrevink stayed in 1899, is surrounded by the largest colony of Ad lie Penguins in the World.
Days 24-28
Sailing towards the Balleny Islands and continuing through the Southern Ocean towards Macquarie Island.
Day 29
Macca, also known as Macquarie Island, is a Tasmanian State Reserve that in 1997 became a World Heritage Site. The Australian Antarctic Division has its permanent base on this island, which Australian sealer Frederick Hasselborough discovered while searching for new sealing grounds. The fauna on Macquarie is fantastic, and there are colonies of king, gentoo, and southern rockhopper penguins as well as almost one million breeding pairs of the endemic royal penguin. Elephant seals and various fur seal species, such as the New Zealand fur seal, are also present.
Day 30
Heading northwest to Campbell Island, you're once again followed by numerous seabirds.
Day 31
We plan to visit the sub-Antarctic New Zealand Reserve and a UNESCO World Heritage Site of Campbell Island, with a luxuriant and blooming vegetation. The fauna on Campbell Island is fantastic with a large and easily accessible colony of Southern Royal Albatrosses on the main island and breeding Wandering, Campbell, Grey-headed, Black-browed, and Light-mantled Albatrosses on the satellite islands. Also three penguin species, Eastern Rockhopper, Erect-Crested and Yellow-Eyed Penguins breed here. In the 18th century seals were hunted to extinction, but Elephant Seals, Fur Seals and Sea Lions have recovered.
Day 32
The Sub-Antarctic Convergence zone is very close to the area we will sail through, so we expect the bird life to reflect this as we depart Campbell Island. Birds we may spot include the Wandering Albatross, Royal Albatross, Black-browed Albatross, Light-mantled Sooty Albatross, Salvin's Albatross, Grey-headed Albatross, Northern and Southern Giant Petrel, Sooty Shearwater, and Little Shearwater. We will endeavour to spot the Fairy Prion, Fulmar Prion and Antarctic Prion never an easy task but we should get some great views. There are also many species of Petrel to be on the look-out for including the Soft-plumaged Petrel, Mottled Petrel, White-headed Petrel, Wilson's Storm Petrel, Black-bellied Storm Petrel and Common Diving Petrel.
Day 33
We arrive in Bluff (New Zealand) where we clear customs and our trip concludes. (A scheduled group transfer will be arranged to Invercargill)