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South Georgia, Falkland Islands and the Antarctic Peninsula on Plancius

This voyage cruises to the Falkland Islands, where on the western side of the archipelago, we will discover Black-Browed Albatross sharing their colony with sturdy Rockhopper Penguins and Port Stanley, the capital of the Falklands. We then cruise to South Georgia, a region boasting a huge diversity of mammals, whales and birds. The island comprises of a series of harbours that once sheltered large fleets of whaling ships. In South Georgia we plan to visit Stromness Bay, the King Penguin colonies on Salisbury Plain, Grytviken (Whaling History Museum) as well as Shackleton's grave. Combine this with the natural wonders of the South Orkney Islands and the spectacular Antarctic Peninsula and you have the makings of a truly memorable voyage. Exploring the western flanks of the Antarctic Peninsula provides a further highlight to our trip, with regular shore excursions to stretch your legs while enjoying the wildlife and visiting the scientific stations.

Inclusions

18 breakfasts, 17 lunches and 18 dinners
Comfortable cabin accommodation and use of all public areas on cruise
Specialist expedition staff
All shore excursions from the ship including the use of Zodiacs
Lectures, videos, slide and film shows and guide services
Medical services (there is a resident medical officer and infirmary on board)
Port taxes and port charges imposed by government authorities
Pre-departure information
Hightlights
The most wildlife-rich part of Antarctica - penguins, whales, seals, sea birds
South Georgia and Falkland Islands
Historic sites, including Shackleton's last resting place
Narrow sheltered waterways and fjords
Spectacular mountains rising directly out of the sea
Active scientific stations
Great variety of terrain over short distances
Icebergs and active glaciers
Tour Provider World Expeditions
Number of Days
19
Price From
AUD $14,600
Start Location
Ushuaia, Antarctica
End Location
Antarctica
Age Range
Avg. 30+
Group Size
1 to 114
Tour Style
Standard
Tour Themes
Polar, Small Marine/Cruise
Physical Rating
Mild
Tour departure dates
StartEndAvailabilityPrice
19 Jan 202006 Feb 2020AvailableAUD $14,600
ItineraryExpand
Day 1
You will be warmly greeted by the crew and expedition staff as you embark Plancius in the afternoon. Sailing down the Beagle Channel, we will settle into shipboard life and enjoy our first meal on board, and set our course for the Falkland Islands.
Day 2
At sea, in the Westerlies the ship is followed by several species of albatrosses, storm petrels, shearwaters and diving petrels.
Day 3
The Falkland (Malvinas) Islands offer an abundance of wildlife that is easily approachable, though caution is always advised. These islands are largely unknown gems, the site of a 1982 war between the UK and Argentina. Not only do various species of bird live here, but chances are great you'll see both Peale's dolphins and Commerson's dolphins in the surrounding waters. During this segment of the voyage, you may visit the following sites: Carcass Island Despite its name, this island is pleasantly rodent-free and hence bounteous with birdlife. Anything from breeding Magellanic penguins and gentoos to numerous waders and passerine birds (including Cobb's wrens and tussock-birds) live here. Saunders Island On Saunders Island you can see the black-browed albatross and its sometimes-clumsy landings, along with breeding imperial shags and rockhopper penguins. King penguins, Magellanic penguins, and gentoos are also found here.
Day 4
In Stanley, the capital of the Falklands, we can experience Falkland culture, which has some South American characteristics as well as Victorian charm. In Stanley and the surrounding area, we can see quite an important number of stranded clippers from a century ago. All passengers are free to wander around on their own. We recommend a visit to the local church and museum.
Days 5-6
At sea, on our way to South Georgia we will cross the Antarctic Convergence. Entering Antarctic waters, the temperature will drop by as much as 10 degrees C in the time span of only a few hours. Near the Convergence we will see a multitude of southern seabirds near the ship: several species of Albatrosses, Shearwaters, Petrels, Prions and Skuas. You may decide to join the whale watchers on the bridge, or just relax and read a favourite book.
Days 7-10
Today you arrive at the first South Georgia activity site. Please keep in mind that weather conditions in this area can be challenging, largely dictating the program. Over the next several days, you have a chance to visit the following sites: Prion Island This location is closed during the early part of the breeding season (November 20 January 7). The previous summer's wandering albatross chicks are almost ready to fledge, and adults are seeking out their old partners after a year and a half at sea. Fortuna Bay Near beaches inhabited by various penguins and seals, you have the chance to follow the final leg of Shackleton's route to the abandoned whaling village of Stromness. This path cuts across the mountain pass beyond Shackleton's Waterfall, and as the terrain is partly swampy, be prepared to cross a few small streams. Salisbury Plain, St. Andrews Bay, Gold Harbour These sites not only house the three largest king penguin colonies in South Georgia, they're also three of the world's largest breeding beaches for southern elephant seals. Only during this time of year do they peak in their breeding cycle. Watch the four-ton bulls keep a constant vigil (and occasionally fight) over territories where dozens of females have just given birth or are about to deliver. You can also see a substantial number of Antarctic fur seals here during the breeding season (December January). Grytviken In this abandoned whaling station, king penguins walk the streets and elephant seals lie around like they own the place because they basically do. Here you might be able to see the South Georgia Museum as well as Shackleton's grave.
Day 11
Leaving South Georgia we head across the Scotia Sea in a south-westerly direction towards the South Orkney Islands, a stunning group of islands, remote and alone jutting out of the sea. At some point we might encounter sea-ice, and it is at the ice-edge where we might have a chance to see some high-Antarctic species like the McCormick Skua and Snow Petrel.
Day 12
We are aiming to visit the Argentine Orcadas Station on Laurie Island (South Orkney Islands). Orcadas Station is the oldest continuously operating weather station in Antarctica. The friendly base personnel will show us their facilities and we can enjoy the wonderful views of the surrounding glaciers.
Day 13
Today we set course for the Weddell Sea. Time to reflect and enjoy the lectures on board.
Days 14-16
If the ice conditions permit, you now sail into the Weddell Sea. Here colossal tabular icebergs herald your arrival to the eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula. Paulet Island, with its large population of Ad lie penguins, is a possible stop. You might also visit Brown Bluff, located in the ice-clogged Antarctic Sound, where you could get the chance to set foot on the Antarctic Continent itself. If conditions aren't favorable to enter the Weddell Sea from the east, the ship will set course for Elephant Island and head into the Bransfield Strait, between South Shetland Island and the Antarctic Peninsula. Here you can attempt to access the Antarctic Sound from the northwest.
Days 17-18
While at sea there is ample opportunity to observe the sea birds that follow the ship. This is a time for reflection and discussion about our many experiences with shipboard friends.
Day 19
During the early morning we will cruise up the Beagle Channel, before quietly slipping into dock in Ushuaia. It is a busy time, with people saying farewell to our crew and others who have shared the intensity of being in a magnificent white wilderness. We will head off in our different directions, hopefully with a new found sense of the power of natural forces.